Find Balance In Your Photography (And I’m Not Talking About Composition)

Balance is a concept many photographers use to evenly place objects within the frame of the composition. This concept sometimes makes a photo more appealing to the eye.

So how about applying balance to your method of actually capturing the photos?

The sun rises from behind Mt. Adams during a summer 2017 backpacking trip. While I really like this photo, I wished I spent more time on this trip enjoying the experience rather than stressing over finding compositions.

What I mean is, rather than just rush out to these amazing spots for the purpose of capturing a great photo, take your time and enjoy your surroundings, and the experience of being there.

Social media has influenced the way a lot of hikers see the wilderness.

While some like to experience the wilderness for solidarity, peace, and enhancing our well-being, quite a few others may just simply rush out to these destinations for the purpose of capturing that perfect photo, and updating our social media accounts.

Found this great waterfall while exploring in the Mt. Adams Wilderness. With my new outlook, I had spent a lot less time searching for different compositions, and more time actually enjoying this waterfall.

My method of applying balance is simple…..you can still enjoy finding the compositions you want, enjoy capturing these in your photographs, and enjoy sharing with your friends. However, you should allow photography to sometimes take a back seat, to ensure that you are also equally enjoying the other benefits that the outdoors provide, rather than just capturing your photos and leaving.

I used to rush home after a hike and immediately analyze the photos I have taken, then I would feel the stress of choosing the ones I like, and I would hurriedly post them to my social media accounts and await the feedback.

While the attention of posting my best photography to social media was initially fulfilling, I begin to wonder why I feel so stressed after an adventure, when I should be relaxing and reflecting about what I had experienced while out in the wilderness.

I would actually judge the experience based on how many comments and likes that I received, and this seemed really unnatural to me.

While I am still incredibly passionate about taking photographs, I have changed how I experience the outdoors. Instead of just seeing photography as being the priority, I allow pictures take a back seat to the actual experience of exploring and experiencing the environment. I use less time focusing on capturing the photographs, and more time on enjoying and exploring the natural wonders around me.

This thought process has also conditioned me to become more selective on my photographs. This also lightens the load of the often daunting task of photo processing on my laptop when I get back home.

It took me just a few minutes to capture this photograph, one of my favorites. Thankfully, I spent more time enjoying the sights and sounds of an amazing mountain lake below the Milky Way, and that experience was the most memorable to me.

The result……

I am more relaxed about my photography. I am no longer stressed or anxious about feedback from my photos, and I no longer feel disappointed if I missed a particular shot or if the weather did not cooperate.

I am out in the wilderness to enjoy the environment, and as a reward, I get to bring back some great photos that I took along the way.

Give this some thought next time you are out there!

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